Ancient Persian Refrigerators

Yakhchal_of_Yazd_province

Yakhchāl is an ancient type of evaporative cooler.

Above ground, the structure had a domed shape, but had a subterranean storage space; it was often used to store ice, but sometimes was used to store food as well. The subterranean space coupled with the thick heat-resistant construction material insulated the storage space year round.

1200px-20110102_Ice_House_(interior)_Meybod_Iran

By 400 BCE, Persian engineers had mastered the technique of storing ice in the middle of summer in the desert. Ice was stored in a specially designed, passively cooled refrigerator.

This was a large underground space that had thick walls (at least two meters at the base) made out of a special mortar called sārooj, composed of sand, clay, egg whites, lime, goat hair, and ash in specific proportions.

1200px-20110102_Ice_House_(exterior)_Meybod_Iran

Via Wikipedia.

This entry was posted in Gadgets, History by Heretic. Bookmark the permalink.

About Heretic

I design video games for a living, write fiction, political theory and poetry for personal amusement, and train regularly in Western European 16th century swordwork. On frequent occasion I have been known to hunt for and explore abandoned graveyards, train tunnels and other interesting places wherever I may find them, but there is absolutely no truth to the rumor that I am preparing to set off a zombie apocalypse. Nothing that will stand up in court, at least. I use paranthesis with distressing frequency, have a deep passion for history, anthropology and sociological theory, and really, really, really hate mayonnaise. But I wash my hands after the writing. Promise.

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