Giovanni Boccaccio’s Fortuna of 1410

Fortuna-Giovanni-Boccacio

Giovanni Boccaccio (1313 – 21 December 1375) was an Italian author, poet, correspondent of Petrarch, and important Renaissance humanist. Boccaccio wrote a number of notable works, including the Decameron and On Famous Women.

Following the failed coup of 1361, a number of Boccaccio’s close friends and other acquaintances were executed or exiled in the subsequent purge. Although not directly linked to the conspiracy, it was in this year that Boccaccio left Florence to reside in Certaldo, and became less involved in government affairs.

Boccaccio’s change in writing style in the 1350s was not due just to meeting with Petrarch. It also was due to disappointments in love. Some such disappointment could explain why Boccaccio, having previously written always in praise of women and love, came suddenly to write in a bitter Corbaccio style.

Petrarch then dissuaded Boccaccio from burning his own works and selling off his personal library, letters, books, and manuscripts.

Image via Retronaut.
Quoted text via Wikipedia.

This entry was posted in History, Visual Art by Heretic. Bookmark the permalink.

About Heretic

I design video games for a living, write fiction, political theory and poetry for personal amusement, and train regularly in Western European 16th century swordwork. On frequent occasion I have been known to hunt for and explore abandoned graveyards, train tunnels and other interesting places wherever I may find them, but there is absolutely no truth to the rumor that I am preparing to set off a zombie apocalypse. Nothing that will stand up in court, at least. I use paranthesis with distressing frequency, have a deep passion for history, anthropology and sociological theory, and really, really, really hate mayonnaise. But I wash my hands after the writing. Promise.

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